Building Capacity for Emissions Trading: The ICAP Training Courses for Emerging Economies and Developing Countries

Several contributions to this issue of the Carbon & Climate Law Review have illustrated current efforts to introduce emissions trading systems in the developing world. Overall, this is a welcome trend, as it shows that carbon markets are successfully incentivizing more robust mitigation efforts in countries with the fastest growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Given that any meaningful action on climate change will necessitate allocation of scarce resources among many competing aims, the flexibility and efficiency gains offered by a marketbased approach may indeed be critical for any prospect of avoiding dangerous anthropogenic interference with the global climate system. It is thus readily apparent that ensuring the integrity of these emissions trading systems will become vitally important far beyond the national boundaries of the countries that introduce them.

Yet despite their conceptual simplicity, marketbased approaches for environmental policy are sophisticated instruments that place high demands on the technical, policy and institutional capacity of implementing jurisdictions. Compared to the project- based mechanisms of the Kyoto Protocol, moreover, emissions trading systems operate at a larger scale, meaning that a flawed design can undermine the success of an entire national climate strategy. It is therefore essential that countries choosing to implement an emissions trading system possess the necessary capacities to operate the carbon market, with a high degree of involvement by both public and private stakeholders.
Capacity needs – or, to use a term that has become widely used, elements of market readiness – relate to a broad range of issues faced in the design and implementation of an emissions trading system. Already before it endeavors to set up a carbon market, for instance, the implementing jurisdiction must be able to assess the mitigation potential and cost in different sectors and determine the feasibility of including these sectors in an emissions trading system. At the technical level, it needs to create arrangements inter alia for the measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of emissions as well as the tracking of allowances and market transactions. And at the institutional level, it needs to set up structures and assign responsibilities for the collection of data, allocation of allowances, and monitoring or – where necessary – enforcing compliance.



Copyright: © Lexxion Verlagsgesellschaft mbH
Quelle: Issue 4/2012 (Dezember 2012)
Seiten: 6
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Autor: Tobias Hausotter
Michael Mehling

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