WASTE RECYCLING IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES IN AFRICA: BARRIERS TO IMPROVING RECLAMATION RATES

The volumes of waste being generated and which must be collected and disposed of, is requiring ever increasing funds to manage it and is creating increasing environmental concerns due to large landfill sites which are not properly operated and are causing major pollution. Any possible method of saving on the quantity of waste going to landfill must be implemented. In the developing world reclamation of recyclable waste products, or re-usable items from the municipal waste stream, has become an important source of revenue for many people who cannot find formal employment.

The volumes of waste being generated in any city, and that must be collected and disposed of, require ever increasing funds to manage it and it is also creating increasing environmental concerns. In the developing world reclamation of recyclable waste products from the municipal waste stream has become an important source of revenue for many people who cannot find formal employment and it is their only source of income. The level of reclamation varies substantially however between the different countries in Africa. It has been found that there are a number of barriers to improving, or formalising this process, and this paper will aim to identify these barriers and will propose a number of potential solutions to improve the recovery rates as well as the income stream for the individual reclaimers. In Africa in general, reclamation is done by the informal sector in a very unorganised manner and is mainly done by very poor unemployed people who are able to improve their way of life and get a small income by scavenging firstly usable items such as containers for storage of household items, material to construct shelters with, clothing, etc or food, and secondly items that have a value and can be sold to recyclers. Because the recycling industry is still in its infancy compared to the manufacturing industry, the reward for recyclable materials fluctuates a lot. There is also a very limited market for recyclables, and it is also a fact that in a number of areas the general recycling market is just not aware of the potential value in reclaimed materials.



Copyright: © IWWG International Waste Working Group
Quelle: Specialized Session C (Oktober 2007)
Seiten: 9
Preis inkl. MwSt.: € 9,00
Autor: C.J. Liebenberg

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